Upon Their Backs To Bite ’Em


#1

An adventure written and run by @Shimmin.

Session 1 - Labradoresque: Popular vet and weird fiction author Mick Narsh has gone missing near Dartmoor. Will his friends be able to track him down?

Session 2 - I Can’t Drink My Cup-a-Soup With This Moustache: We poke the village. It pokes back.

Session 3 - Waving Like a Field of Fat Corn: We try to make our getaway. And learn how to tell champagne from turbid horse urine. (And teach a Valuable Lesson in what happens if you support the show.)


#2

I feel obliged to question the use of the terms “popular” and “friends” in this description.


#3

I need to find a game where “weird veterinarian” is a viable occupation!


#4

“Ah, I see the problem, this shoggoth is far too eldritch. Have you been letting it eat Jehovah’s Witnesses again?”


#5

Risus not only lets you do this, it practically encourages such things.


#6

True, but I tend to play with people who like more game in their game. And it’s more a matter of setting than system; I can easily see how a weird veterinarian would work mechanically in, say, Fate or Unknown Armies - heck, I can even work it out fairly trivially in GURPS - but making it a useful profession for a PC is a different kettle of fish. (Hey Doc, I think there’s something wrong with my kettlefish!)


#7

Sounds like you need an appointment with Doctor Witch Doctor - you can head over to RPPR and check out this game design discussion podcast episode, or the recent playtest episode.


#8

I am intrigued by the Visitor Centre in the photo. Given that it is outdoors and only consists of a bench and a sign to proclaim it is a visitor centre. Visitors are obviously not very demanding in those parts… :slight_smile:


#9

They may have agreed with you - here is a slightly different angle on it from Google Street View, and the post and sign seem to be gone as of June last year.


#10

Not to be confused with the moderately well-liked vet and weird fiction author Marshall Nickolls, or the despised vet and weird fiction author Nicholas Bog, or the widely adored vet and weird fiction author Cutty Morass, or the herostratically reviled vet and weird fiction author Notch Quagmire, or teen idol vet and weird fiction author Knickknack MacNirsh…


#11

I’m sure I saw some episodes of this very early in the morning some time…


#12

Session 2 - I Can’t Drink My Cup-a-Soup With This Moustache: We poke the village. It pokes back.


#13

Other instant soup mixes are available.


#14

I should have put an Ⓡ in there, shouldn’t I?


#15

Well, you know what sticklers we are for accuracy and getting the legal niceties correct.


#16

I’m still hearing “Chagford” as “Shagford” about half the time. There was even one conversation that seemed to me to go something like:

SHIMMIN: You might have more luck in Shagford.
JOHN: In where?
SHIMMIN: Shagford.
JOHN: Oh, Shagford! Good thing you didn’t say Shagford!


#17

You wait until we go to Shitterton.


#18

In the scholarly journals I edit, the practice has always been to delete the “Trademark” or “Registered” symbols. Trade names are capitalized; generic names are lower case.


#19

Session 3 - Waving Like a Field of Fat Corn: We try to make our getaway. And learn how to tell champagne from turbid horse urine. (And teach a Valuable Lesson in what happens if you support the show.)


#20

Well, if a sparkling wine wasn’t actually made in Champagne, it’s illegal to call it champagne, right? Then, it’s just sparkling wine.

If any vets visit the site, perhaps they could inform us whether it’s legal to use the term “turbid horse urine” for any kind of equine micturition, or if that name only applies if and when the fluid in question originated within the area of Turbid-Horse-Urine-upon-Tweed.